Set Them Free!

I was just reading a hilarious post at Heather-the-Lawyer’s GreyMatter blog, Held in Contempt, which I’ve just added to my blogroll. It occurred to me that most lawyers are chained up and bound. They are bound to their computers, their laptops, their e-mail, their blackberries, their Day-Timers, their dockets. The silliest sight I see every morning are hordes of lawyers milling about the lobby waiting for the elevator, heads down, fingers clicking away at their firm-issued blackberries, scroll, click, frown, click, scroll. No one makes eye contact anymore, either.

And these things (these infernal, damnable devices) are really no better than those ankle bracelets* that parolees are required to wear. It’s basically just an electronic leash.

I’m glad I don’t have one…. But then again, if I did, I don’t suppose I’d consider it too oppressive, as much as I love the Internet….

* [Reprinted below]

Have your bracelet call my briefcase
01/26/01

By Wilson Dizard III
GCN Staff

JAN. 26—Parolees in Utah might soon have their movements followed by satellite.

The state’s Corrections Department next week will propose testing a parolee monitoring system that uses ankle bracelets in wireless communication with briefcase-size satellite uplinks.

Department spokesman Jack Ford said the state already uses several types of ankle bracelet systems, but all require terrestrial telephone links. The department plans to ask the Legislature for funds to test the satellite system.

Ford said the presentation has been delayed, however, because the technology is not yet working properly.

When it works, the satellite system can give minute-by-minute updates of a parolee’s location within about 40 feet. It pinpoints the location anywhere in the United States via a geographic information system.

Utah parolees would have to carry the uplink constantly to update their coordinates. If the briefcase unit were left behind, the ankle bracelet would send a wireless alert. Corrections officers would monitor parolee location data via the Internet.

? 2002 PostNewsweek Tech Media, a division of Post Newsweek Media

Leave a Comment