Friday Five

For once, I’m on time!

1. What were your favorite childhood stories? I loved “The Five Little Peppers and How They Grew,” which my mother bought for me. I read that very early on. I also read a novel called “The Boxcar Children” and thoroughly enjoyed that. I believe I was in the second grade at that time. I also recall “Call it Courage,” which my third-grade class read together. When I was a bit older, I started reading books by Elisabeth Ogilvie. The books centered around a teenager living in Maine and her adventures in high school. Heady stuff for a nine-year old!

2. What books from your childhood would you like to share with [your] children? I don’t have any children and don’t plan to, but I think that the ones I mentioned above are great. I’m sure little boys would eschew the Elizabeth Ogilvie series. But I’m sure they’d love “Call it Courage.” But no child’s library is complete without at least one book by Shel Silverstein.

3. Have you re-read any of those childhood stories and been surprised by anything? Never had the chance. But you can find “The Five Little Peppers and How They Grew” in its entirety online here:

4. How old were you when you first learned to read? About five.

5. Do you remember the first ‘grown-up’ book you read? How old were you? I remember being a precocious child and wanting to read books in the “adult” section of our local library. (By “adult,” I simply mean, “as opposed to ‘children’s’ or ‘juvenile’ section.) My mother had to get a special library card for me to allow me to check out books from the adult section. I was 12 years old when I read Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables.” And I had become thoroughly familiar with and enchanted by the works of Edgar Allen Poe when I was eight, having chosen “The Raven” to recite in front of my third-grade class for our poetry reading that year.

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